Big Data

Big Data, Cloud Computing and Industry Perspectives with Dave Kellogg

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I had the pleasure of working with Dave Kellogg early in my marketing career and continue to learn from him as a regular subscriber to his popular blog, Kellblog. A seasoned Silicon Valley executive, Dave has been a board member (Aster Data), CEO (MarkLogic), CMO (Business Objects) and VP of Marketing (Versant and Ingres). I recently sat down with Dave to discuss industry trends. As always, he didn’t hold back.

You’ve written a lot about “Big Data” on your blog. Why is it such a hot topic in the world of data management?

Dave Kellogg: First I think Big Data is a hot topic because it represents the first time in about 30 years that people are rethinking databases. Literally, since about 1980 people haven’t had to think much about databases. If you were an SMB, you went SQL server; if you were enterprise, you’d go Oracle or IBM depending on your enterprise preferences. But in terms of technology, to paraphrase Henry Ford: any color you want, as long it’s relational.

Overall, I think Big Data is hot for three reasons:

  • Major new innovation is finally happening with databases for the first time in three decades.
  • Hardware architectures have changed — people want to scale horizontally like Google.
  • We are experiencing a serious explosion in the amount of data people are analyzing and managing. Machine-generated data, the exhaust of the Web, is driving a lot of it.

I think Big Data is challenging on many fronts from the cool (e.g., analytics and query optimization), to the practical (e.g., horizontal scaling), to the mundane (e.g., backup and recovery).

What’s the intersection with Cloud Computing?

Dave Kellogg: I think when people say cloud computing, they mean one of several things:

I think Big Data intersects with cloud in several ways. First, the people running cloud services are dealing with Big Data problems. They are hosting thousands of customers’ databases and generating log records from hundreds of thousands of users. I also think Big Data analytics are very dynamic loads. One minute you want nothing, then suddenly you need to throw 100 servers at a complex problem for several hours.

How do you see these trends changing the role of IT?

Dave Kellogg: I think corporate IT is constantly evolving because smart corporations want their internal resources focused on activities that they can’t buy elsewhere and that generate competitive advantage for the business.

IT used to buy and run computers. Then they used to build and run applications. Then they focused on weaving together packaged applications. Going forward, they will focus on tightly integrating cloud-based services. They will also continue to focus on company-proprietary analytics used to gain competitive advantage.

The other trend driving IT is consumerization. The Web sets expectations for functionality, user interface and quality that corporate IT must meet with internal systems. The bar has gone way up – people won’t tolerate old-school ERP-style interfaces at work when they’re used to Facebook or Yelp.

What does that mean for technology sales and marketing?

Dave Kellogg: If Mr. Robinson (of The Graduate) were dishing out advice today, instead of saying “plastics” he’d say “data science.” More and more companies will use data scientists to analyze their business and drive tactical operations. First you need to gather a whole bunch of data about your operations and customers. Then you need to throw world-class data analysts at it to get business value and to be sure you don’t draw false conclusions – e.g., mixing causality with correlation.

Today, most companies have their sales departments on salesforce.com. Leading marketing departments are on Marketo or Eloqua, but most marketers still don’t have much technology backing them. Going forward you will see a whole class of analytics applications vendors providing advanced analytics for Salesforce (e.g., Cloud9, Good Data) and the marketing automation vendors will move beyond lead incubation into providing overall marketing suites. I expect Marekto or Eloqua to try to do for the chief marketing officer what SuccessFactors did for the chief people officer – and if they don’t, then there’s a real opportunity for someone else.

Speaking of all things cloud, you often write about Silicon Valley trends. How would you characterize what’s going on in the market right now?

Dave Kellogg: From my perception, the Silicon Valley innovation engine is running full out. Top VCs are raising new funds. I meet a few new startups every day. Of late, I’ve met fascinating companies in next-generation business intelligence, analytics, Big Data, social media monitoring and exploitation and Web application development. One of the more interesting things I’ve found is a VC fund dedicated to big data – IA Ventures (in New York). When I heard about them, I thought: oh, lots of Big Data infrastructure and platform technologies. Then I spent some time and realized that most of their portfolio is about exploiting new Big Data infrastructure technologies via vertical applications. That was really interesting.

People will debate whether we’re in a mini tech bubble or a social networking-specific bubble. Who knows? I just read an article in the The Wall Street Journal that argues $140B valuation for Facebook is realistic, and it was fairly convincing. So you can debate the bubble issue but you can’t debate that the IPO market has been closed for a long time. Now it is starting to open, and that’s a huge change in Silicon Valley.

Entrepreneurs have historically dreamed of creating $1B independent companies. I’d say for most of the last decade they’ve dreamed of getting bought for 5-10x revenues. Michael Arrington had a great quote a while back saying that ”an entire generation of entrepreneurs [has been lost] building dipshit companies that sell to Google for $25M.”D I think those days are over. When the IPO window opens, people dream of building stand-alone companies.

What advice do you have for both entrepreneurs and IT veterans?

Dave Kellogg: Don’t build or run things that you can buy or rent. If you follow that mantra, you will follow market trends, and always stay at the right stack-layer to ensure that you are adding value as opposed to leveraging old skill sets. While you may know how to run a Big Data center, you can now rent time in one more cost-effectively. So either go work for a company that runs data centers (e.g., Equinix) if that’s your pleasure, or go leverage the people who do. Put differently, don’t be static. If you’re still using skills you learned 10 years ago, make sure that you’re not teeing yourself up to get left behind.

Darren Cunningham is VP of marketing for Informatica Cloud.

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