SandHill.com: Software Pulse

Business Strategy for Software Executives

December 26, 2005

MR Rangaswami

Looking Back at 2005

SandHill.com presents the opinion pieces which defined the year in software business strategy.

It is difficult to believe that we only launched SandHill.com last February. It was our intention to provide software executives with an online resource for strategic business information.

It seems that we have succeeded. Since our launch, traffic to the site has grown 10 to 20 percent per month. And every week, this Software Pulse newsletter reaches 12,000 software CEOs, VPs, VCs and other executives in the enterprise software ecosystem.

We've received tremendous feedback on our features, including our lead opinion pieces and the SandHill.com Blog. We've also provided timely updates on software news, venture capital deals and M&As.

As traffic grew, we launched several new features, including articles from The McKinsey Quarterly, Software Personalities and SandHill.com Radar. We are planning several new features for next year so send us your feedback on the site and the newsletter.

This edition of Software Pulse provides a compendium of the opinion pieces and SandHill.com Blog posts which best exemplified the software business in 2005. We hope you'll find a few articles on the list that you missed or want to read again.

We thank you for your readership this year and wish you the all the best this holiday season and in 2006.

M.R. Rangaswami
Publisher
SandHill.com

The Coming Service Revolution
More than a change in pricing or business model, software as a service is an inevitable, fundamental shift in enterprise software culture.
By Ray Lane, Kleiner Perkins

Software that Makes CIOs Happy
Top IT executives from Unilever, BP, Lockheed Martin and Kaiser Permanente provide insights on what software vendors can do to improve their product offerings.
By Maryann Jones Thompson, Sand Hill Group

The New Game in Software: Applistructure
The enterprise software business is becoming the latest version of Texas fold-em. Whoever can effectively deliver Applistructure will take away most of the chips.
By Erik Keller, Principal of Wapiti

Inside Informix' Demise
Here's the story behind Informix' revenue restatements, why former CEO Phil White did it and what today's executives can learn from the experience.
By Steve W. Martin

10 Ways to Maximize Employee Value
Employees are arguably a software company's most important asset. Here's how to create an environment that improves their performance.
By Dr. James Goodnight, CEO, SAS

Last Chance for Software 2006 Earlybird Discount

Software 2006 promises to be the single most important event of the year for software business leaders. The conference theme – Unifying the Ecosystem – will fuel productive debate about software industry challenges and solutions. Here are three reasons to register now.

  1. Industry-shaping keynotes by software leaders such as Ray Lane (Kleiner Perkins), CK Prahalad (University of Michigan), Shai Agassi (SAP), Dave DeWalt (EMC) and S. Ramadorai (TCS).
  2. Opportunities to network with 2,500 software CEOs, VPs, CIOs, investors, media, analysts and other professionals.
  3. An earlybird registration rate of $1,195 which allows you to bring two colleagues to the conference – a $1,595 value - at no extra charge for attendees registering before Dec. 31, 2005.

It all happens April 4-5, 2006 at the Santa Clara Convention Center. Find out more at www.Software2006.com.

The SandHill.com Blog in Review

Gather experts from around the software industry. Provide one “blog” with multiple topics of interest. Post the best perspectives of the week. That was the genesis behind the SandHill.com Blog.

After launching in March, dozens of software business strategists have provided their opinions on everything from technology trends to marketing to hurricane survival. Here are a handful of posts that best represented 2005.

Merger Mania or an Almost Economically Rational Industry?
An analysis of why software consolidation is long overdue - and healthy.
By Mike Nevens

Survival of the Adaptable
Why the software companies most receptive to change will be the successful ones.
By Paul Lavallee, VentureFuel.com

VCs: More Indiana Jones and Captain Kirks needed
Some suggestions for software venture capitalists.
By Vinnie Mirchandani, SourcingWorld Partners

SaaS Drives a New Perception of Software
An analysis of why software-as-a-service has a strong future.
By Jeffrey Nolan, SAP Ventures

Measurable Marketing Becomes a Possibility
How the Internet is changing software marketing -- for the better.
By Matt Miller, Walden VC

Outsourcing -- The Inevitable Market Realignment
A look at how and why offshoring is changing the software business.
By S. Sadagopan, Satyam

SEC Takes Action Against Former i2 Execs
An in-depth analysis of the the troubles at i2.
By Bruce Richardson, AMR

Software in a Hurricane
One software company CEO's perspective of running his company during Hurricane Katrina.
By Ken Murray, VanillaSoft


Poll: Software Story of the Year?

Which news story best exemplified the software business in 2005?
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Parting Thought

“It ain't the whistle that moves the train.”
— Anonymous

Courtesy of Malcolm Kusher, The Kushner Group